HopeLab on Twitter: Follow
Chris Murchison

Can Business Be a Force for Good?

July 24, 2014

Negative business practices earn splashy headlines, e.g., Enron, AIG, and others. But I’ve always believed that business can be a force for good, both for the individuals that make up the organization and society at large.

In May, the University of Michigan’s Ross Business School hosted the first annual Positive Business Conference, drawing over 350 scholars, business executives, HR leaders, and others to hear about research, stories and practices in successful and positive businesses across the globe.

RossBiz

“We develop leaders who make a positive difference in the world,” states Allison Davis-Blake, the Dean of the Business School. “We can solve our most complex challenges by empowering those who believe that business can, and should, be a force for good.”

The power of positive organizations

According to conference organizers, positive business is built on three foundations, (1) creating positive value in the world, (2) creating great workplaces, and (3) being a good neighbor in your community and to the planet. Participants at the conference were introduced to scholarship and practice in all three domains, everything from responsible supply chain management to positive accounting to building high-quality connections in workplace communities.

As a longtime believer in the necessity of building positive workplaces, I found that the conference was an incredible opportunity to better understand different organizational aspects that must work together to support a system that creates positive value in the world.

I was impressed by executives who shared stories about how they’re revamping employee rewards systems, crafting unique programs to support disadvantaged community members, catalyzing innovations to support environmental sustainability, and more.  I was also inspired by faculty whose research shows so beautifully the impact of positive business practices today.

Weeks after the conference, one particular quote stands out to me. “It’s not just about culture, it’s about changing the world,” says Dan Hendrix, CEO of Interface. His comment is a great reminder that positive workplaces tap the full potential of people and that an engaged workforce enables an organization to achieve its mission and make a positive impact in the world.


DanHendrix

For any leader who wants to learn about culture and business impact, I highly encourage you to attend next year’s conference.

I will definitely be there.


Fred Dillon

How a Sense of Empowerment Can Improve Health

July 14, 2014

When bad things happen to us, we often feel powerless to change them. Our sense of control is threatened by the circumstances of the world around us. Conversely, experiences that give us a sense of control – that help us see how we can affect our circumstances – tap into our psychological resilience and even support our physical health. Can we design technologies that bolster our sense of control in life? And what would that look like?

empowermentHere’s one example. Imagine you’re a kid diagnosed with cancer. You likely feel very little control over what’s happening inside your body. You may even question your ability to fight your disease. At HopeLab, we asked ourselves, how might we give kids with cancer a greater sense of control and support their belief that they could do what it takes to fight cancer and win? Those questions led to our Re-Mission game projects.

In Re-Mission and Re-Mission 2, we’ve made an invisible enemy – cancer – visible and given kids the power to fight back at their disease. Through game play, kids can blast away cancer cells, battle infections, and manage side effects associated with cancer and cancer treatments. The games don’t cure cancer, but they do boost kids’ self-efficacy and give them a sense of greater control. And that sense of control can translate into healthier behavior and measureable biological outcomes.

In a randomized clinical trial, young cancer patients who played Re-Mission stuck to their medications more consistently. Cancer patients who played the game had a greater sense of self-efficacy, or belief that they could influence their own cancer outcomes. And they were more motivated to beat their cancer by sticking to their prescribed meds. In fact, a follow-up Stanford neuroimaging study showed that the part of the brain that reflects motivation lit up in kids who played the game, more than in kids who were just watching the game. The study also demonstrated that the interactive nature of game play was key in delivering that sense of motivation. So it’s not surprising that the kids with cancer who play Re-Mission games feel a greater sense of control, which makes them more likely to take their medications and improve their chances for full recovery.

These kinds of results can be replicated beyond cancer, in any scenario where a healthy sense of control might bolster resilience in the face of adversity. This suggests an opportunity space for developers and designers. There are plenty of apps that help you gain control over your pill schedule or track your weight loss – but what apps have you seen that help you gain a sense of control over your destiny.

What might those apps look like?


Kevin Neilson

The Power of Positive Organizations

June 25, 2014

Last month at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, HopeLab was honored to be named one of five finalists for the Positive Business Project, a contest designed to celebrate exceptional businesses and business leaders that make a positive difference in the world.

“Positive business practices can—and do—have transformative results within organizations and the entries are proof of that,” said Wally Hopp, senior associate dean for faculty and research at Ross.

Please take a moment to watch our video submission.

Questions and curiosities—they’re all welcome!


Leah Weiss

Three Tips for Fostering Resilience in Children

June 23, 2014

I’d like to tell you a story. Tell me if it sounds familiar.

worried parent

Before my daughter was born, I researched everything we purchased for her, deciphering implications of materials and potential off-gassing risks. Changing tables, mattresses, clothing—everything.

When she was born, I pored over parenting books, intent on finding the perfect solution to the challenge of the week, whether it was sleep, nursing, weight gain, reflux, you name it.

Now that she’s four, I worry about how to raise an exuberant girl to be true to herself and resilient as she confronts the harried perfectionism and success-driven ethos of our culture.

Sound familiar? Here’s what to do about it – or at least, here are a few things I try to keep in mind on my own parenting journey.

Admit it: things fall apart

When parents think about fostering resilience in children, we often focus on how to best to support our kids, not ourselves as parents. This increases the risk of ignoring a few fundamental truths:

We cannot line things up to create a perpetually optimal experience for our children.

We cannot get things right for them all of the time.

We cannot keep our children in a bubble to mitigate their experience of the world.

Life will intrude despite our best efforts. It always does.

life

Case in point: my heart broke the first time I witnessed an older group of children telling my daughter she couldn’t play with them. I teach mindfulness and compassion, and still I wanted to throw it down right there in the playground with a freckled, puffy-haired four-year old boy.

Instead, to avoid a truly embarrassing situation, I took a few deep breaths and focused my attention on the emotions I was experiencing. Once I calmed down, I put the situation in perspective and remembered that moments like these are exactly the experiences that will help my little girl tap into her resilience. When I asked her how she was feeling and invited her to think of ideas for different responses, we were both able to approach the conversation with more perspective and creativity.

Show, don’t tell

We know from research that modeling is one of the most successful ways to transmit values to children. No matter how hard we try, we’ll never succeed in teaching children to be curious, disciplined or resilient if we consistently exhibit counter-examples to the values we encourage them to live by.

This doesn’t mean we have to be perfect. But it does suggest that parents should start with their own experience.

To promote resilience in children, show them how it’s done in the face of life’s adversities. Here are some practical tips parents can start using today:

Focus on yourself—sounds crazy, right? But when you commit to your own well-being, your child sees first-hand the values by which you live. Behavior is so powerful because it shows what we value without our having to talk about it.

Be transparent—when you fall short of your own expectations, fess up. Be candid with your children. If you’re snide with your partner in front of your children, take it as an opportunity to say that you got frustrated, that you did something you regret. Think out loud about how you want to apologize, about how you want to do something different next time. This way they see that you’re working with the same tools you’re preaching to them.

Catch yourself—notice the habit of skipping over your own experience to focus on your child. When your children are fraying your nerves, you can pause and bring awareness to yourself in the situation. Is your heart racing? Take a deep breath or even a grown-up time out. Then, when you engage with your child, you’ll be more likely to respond skillfully rather than react out of frustration.

Frame challenges—look for opportunities to contextualize difficulties as a learning experience, not a problem to be fixed. When a child complains about homework or piano lessons, use the opportunity to model perseverance and commitment. Identify areas of incremental growth. Notice how skills improve over time with practice. And praise effort rather than performance outcomes.

parenting

Resilience starts with you

As a parent, I often catch myself falling into the mental trap that there’s a right way to parent, and if I can only find it, somehow, miraculously, I’ll keep my daughter happy, well, and whole. Focusing on myself and practicing these few things help me reorient myself to what will support me in being a better parent so that I can then focus on my daughter. Not only are self-attention and self-compassion helpful here; they’re also critical in fostering resilience for both parent and child.


guest

The Gift of Resilience

June 18, 2014

Life is unpredictable, but one thing is certain: adversity. We all experience struggles, losses, and grief. Yet people react to adversity in different ways: the same trauma that emotionally scars one person and prevents them from moving forward may lead another to grow, to make a new start.

That inspiring way of adapting to a setback and settling into a new normal is called resilience. Resilience isn’t about “bouncing back,” since life after a “bad” event is never quite the same. Rather, it is about incorporating that event and beginning a new chapter in life. Resilience helps people find real meaning, even strength, in effectively dealing with adversity.

Practice makes perfect

Resilience isn’t a rare quality. Rather, it’s a process that takes time, and for each person, it unfolds differently. That’s because resilience combines inner and outer resources, like skills, habits, personality traits, beliefs, relationships, and social networks and communities of like-minded and/or supportive others. So for one person, resilience might consist of optimism, self-awareness, a love of music, and a circle of friends. Another might draw upon an ambition to achieve and a strong religious faith. Still another may be motivated by a fierce determination to prevent similar tragedies in others’ lives.

Because resilience has many strands and many pathways, it isn’t just something you’re born with. It’s something you can cultivate, and one of its key components is the skill of emotion management. You can learn to recognize, understand, label, and express emotions in a healthy way—and, importantly, you can learn to shift emotions and put yourself in a more pleasant or even in a higher-energy state. Managing emotions may be tricky to master, but, like a muscle, it gets stronger with practice.

Build your emotional intelligence

The new Mood Meter App for iOS is the perfect tool to help you practice self-awareness leading to emotion management and ultimately to boost your resilience.

MoodMeter_ScreenShot

You can check in with the app as often as you like through the day. Each time, the Mood Meter App prompts you to consider what you feel at that moment, then record why you feel that way. It then asks you to decide if you want to stay with your current emotion or shift to a more positive one.

That shift—that decision to self-regulate and energize—is at the heart of emotion management. And emotion management is at the heart of resilience. Here the Mood Meter App helps you shift when you chose to, with an array of inspiring quotations and photos. You can also build up a personal archive of words and images that you can draw from when you want to shift your mood.

To help you gain perspective, the Mood Meter App makes it easy to chart your past feelings, whether it’s just today’s or a week’s worth. To help you label and thereby discriminate one feeling from another, the Mood Meter App helps you enhance your emotion vocabulary. And, since another crucial part of resilience is the support and love of other people, you can share your results.

Life isn’t easy—that’s a given. But the gift of resilience can help anyone make the very best of a bad situation, and that gift is within everyone’s reach.

# # #

The Mood Meter App was developed by the authors of this blog in partnership with HopeLab and Reliable Coders. It is anchored in decades of research on emotional intelligence and was deeply informed by the perspectives of potential users.

Robin Stern, Ph.D.

Marc Brackett, Ph.D.

Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence

 


Kevin Neilson

Three Stories on Empowering Kids with Cancer through Games

June 4, 2014

Fighting cancer is tough, especially for kids.

We created the Re-Mission 2 games to empower young patients and help them fight their disease.

And it’s working.

We hope these stories will inspire you to share our free games with someone you know.

mcclurg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet the McClurgs

“Our son Alex is really enjoying your Re-Mission 2 game. He received it at the Children’s Hospital in Birmingham. He is loving it! Alex is fighting Ewing Sarcoma cancer, and he is bound and determined to win this battle. Your game is helping him through it. Thank you so much for what your foundation is doing. It is truly making a difference!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The magic of video game medicine

Dr. Kamalakar  shares how iPads and video games help his patients in their fight against cancer. More.

still

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New game helps empower young cancer patients

ABC News reports on how Re-Mission 2 games help Javier fight cancer. More.

Share you story. Share the games.

Do you have a Re-Mission 2 story to share? If so, we’d love to hear from you. Drop us a line at communications@hopelab.org.

We encourage you to share Re-Mission 2 video games in a clinical setting or with someone you know. They’re free, and our mobile app can be quickly installed and devices and tablets.

# # #

View newsletter here.


Fred Dillon

How Social Connections Save Us

May 14, 2014

Feeling deeply connected to others puts us on a path to happiness and a healthy immune system. That’s right – having healthy social connections has been scientifically proven to improve both our psychological well-being and our physical health.

“Healthy social connections” doesn’t mean having 500 Facebook friends, which can be fun but superficial. What I’m referring to is deep, authentic relationships that make you feel supported and loved.

community

Without deep connections with other people, we grow lonely. And science tells us that loneliness can make us sick. In fact, it can be lethal. Here’s how.

First, let’s be clear about what we mean by loneliness. In this context, loneliness is not the dissatisfaction from a bad month with your lover or friend. It’s not the realization that you only have two or three truly close friends. By loneliness, I mean the long-term condition of wanting and not having social intimacy, not feeling like you belong. Anywhere.

Science demonstrates that the feeling of loneliness wreaks havoc on the body. A published study done at the University of California, Los Angeles, co-authored by Dr. Steve Cole, head of R&D at HopeLab, found that the most reliable predictor of death in HIV-positive gay men was whether or not he was “out,” or open, about his sexuality. Why?

Think about what it feels like to be in the closet about something. It is incredibly lonely. You hide behind a false identity. You impose sharp limits on intimacy and live in constant terror of exposure. At the biological level, stress hormones flood your body and your tissues swell up as your white blood cells swarm to protect you against assault.

In the study, closeted men with HIV died an average of two to three years earlier than men who came out. In fact, the researchers found that the feeling of loneliness was more predictive of an earlier death than whether or not someone had support for maintaining his health. When AIDS-infected white blood cells were place in a soup of stress hormones, the virus replicated three to 10 times faster than it did in cells in a control condition.

What does this mean for all us? It shows us that when we feel connected and safe, our body feels safe. When our body doesn’t feel safe, we get sick. This suggests another opportunity area for developers, in addition to the concept of purpose. There are plenty of apps that allow us to casually meet and share with people, but far fewer that help us cultivate deep connections with others.

How might we use mobile to foster healthy connections between ourselves, even if it meant putting our phones down?


pchristen

Sufficiency is an Inside Job

April 28, 2014

From presidents to parents, we are all leaders in some way. Every day we make choices that matter. In this multi-part series, we encourage readers to consider their choices as leaders using HopeLab’s Questions for a Curious Leader. The goal? To spark a personal, fiercely honest reflection that supports greater clarity – where new possibilities and perspectives can then emerge.

SufficiencyIsAnInsideJob

The concept of sufficiency can mess with your head.  It seems either absurd or hopelessly naïve. Or both. After all, there really are only 24 hours in a day, right? And while you’d love to believe you have “enough,” that doesn’t fly with the bank when you can’t pay your mortgage. These are tangible, real constraints, aren’t they? Quite simply, scarcity is not a mind-set we choose. Or is it?

Consider author Lynne Twist’s belief that “in the nourishment of our attention, our assets expand and grow.” According to Twist:

“We each have the choice in any setting to step back and let go of our mind-set of scarcity. Once we let go of scarcity, we discover the surprising truth of sufficiency. [Sufficiency] isn’t a measure of barely enough or more than enough. Sufficiency isn’t an amount at all. It is an experience, a context we generate, a declaration, a knowing that there is enough and we are enough…In the nourishment of our attention, our assets expand and grow.”

Cultivation of our attention is essential in developing a stance of sufficiency. Yet, in a world of smart phones, mobile tablets, Google glass and 24/7 connectivity, we crave distraction. Indeed we demand it. Frequently, we do not like to be alone with ourselves, finding the place we are in and the people we are with (including ourselves) to be inadequate in the moment.

When is the last time you stood in line at the grocery store, movie theater or bank, waited for an elevator or waited to board a flight and you did NOT reach for your phone?

How often are you in conversation with colleagues, your children, your spouse or partner and you look away from them to check messages on your phone? The message is profound. You, who are in front of me right now, are not as worthy of my full attention as what might be waiting for me virtually. (It is no wonder we are challenged to feel sufficient in light of this constant, explicit rejection.)

In her compelling book, Alone Together, MIT’s Sherry Turkle addresses the manner in which our adulation of technology has amplified our connection to others yet left us feeling lonelier than ever.  We have created an epidemic of digital “dis-ease”.

“In interviews with young and old, I find people genuinely terrified of being cut off from the ‘grid’, explains Turkle. People say that the loss of their cell phones can ‘feel like death.’ One television producer in her mid-forties tells me that, without her smartphone, ‘I feel like I had lost my mind.’ Whether or not our devices are in use, without them, we feel disconnected, adrift.”

Increasingly, we feel incomplete if we are not online, on the grid, connected. If we must have our technology to feel whole, how might we ever feel adequate, sufficient unto to ourselves? How might we ever know that “we are enough?”

When you woke up this morning, did you reach for your phone to check messages before you got out of bed? To check your Facebook account and scan the latest Twitter feeds? Can you imagine not doing so tomorrow morning? What would that feel like? On the road to sufficiency, we learn to set aside our technology at times to make room for our full attention. In our full attention, sufficiency blossoms.

This blog series is based on the writing of Pat Christen, Susan Edsall, Chris Murchison and Richard Tate. In creating Questions for a Curious Leader, we’ve benefited greatly from the contributions of several colleagues and partners. To learn more, please download the quick reference guide.


pchristen

The Making of a Good Story

April 28, 2014

From presidents to parents, we are all leaders. Every day we make choices that matter. In this multipart series, we encourage readers to consider their choices as leaders using HopeLab’s Questions for a Curious Leader. The goal? To spark honest reflection that supports greater clarity – that is where new possibilities emerge.

TheMakingofaGoodStory

Storytelling isn’t bad. Quite the opposite. It’s how we make sense of our experiences. The trouble comes when we believe the stories we tell are the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. We confuse our stories with reality. One way to loosen up our belief that our perception of things—our story—is “the truth” is to imagine that the opposite of our story could be as true as our own.

Consider the following:

February, 2011:  Piedmont, CA:

Disturbance of the peace:  3 AM. Woman calls to report neighbor’s dog is barking loudly, disrupting the entire neighborhood. Woman reports the barking has been going on for over two hours. Officer responds to call and finds the barking dog belongs to the caller. She did not realize her dog had been locked outside.

July, 1984: A man brakes into Jennifer Thompson’s apartment. Alone, Thompson is held at knifepoint and raped. Thompson manages to escape. The man chases her, threatening to kill her. Ultimately, Thompson finds safety at a neighbor’s.

Reporting to the police, Thompson provides a description of her assailant and a composite image is generated. Police then gather photos of potential suspects. Thompson picks Ronald Cotton’s photo out of those shown to her and later picks Cotton out of a police line-up. Thompson goes on to testify against Cotton in court – testimony instrumental to his conviction and sentence of life in prison plus 55 years.

Throughout, Cotton claims he is an innocent man.

After a decade in jail, Cotton’s lawyers prevail in a motion for DNA testing of the semen specimen collected during the investigation. The test reveals the DNA in evidence does not match Cotton’s. He is not the rapist.

Police visit Jennifer Thompson to tell her of Ronald Cotton’s innocence. Confronting the opposite of her story leaves her feeling like she is “drowning in a sea of confusion.”  Cotton’s verdict is thrown out, and he is released from prison. In the ensuing months, Thompson arranges to meet Cotton and asks him to forgive her, which he does.

From the trivial to the significant, our minds are masters at playing tricks on us. If we’re not attentive, it is simply flabbergasting the things we will miss or invent. And from our flawed perceptions of the world, we create stories about the way things are and then label them as “the truth.”

An experiment at Harvard University involving an “invisible gorilla” provides further evidence of our need to be open to looking at the opposite of our stories.

Participants in the experiment were shown a video featuring six people. Three of the people were on one team, wearing black shirts. The remaining three were on another, wearing white shirts. Teammates were passing basketballs to one another.

Participants were instructed to watch the video and count how many times the white-shirted team passed the basketball.

At one point in the video, a person dressed in a gorilla suit ambled into view, turned toward the camera, thumped its chest and then moved off screen. The gorilla was clearly visible for approximately nine seconds.

Do you think you’d notice the gorilla if you were watching the video? Would your perception—your story—of what was on the video include a description a chest-thumping gorilla? Well, in the experiment over half the people who watched the video, counting the passes as requested, missed the gorilla entirely. It was as if the gorilla did not exist for them. They simply did not see the gorilla, so the gorilla did not appear in their story.

How on earth do we miss a gorilla? How do our minds make a gorilla invisible to us?

And if we are capable of missing a chest-thumping gorilla, what else are we missing in the world? And what might that tell us about our stories, our perception of reality, our belief about what is “the truth”?

As psychologist Christopher Chabris explains, “This experiment reveals two things: that we are missing a lot of what goes on around us, and that we have no idea that we are missing so much.”

When those participants who had not seen the gorilla were told of its existence, they could not believe it. When shown the video, some still did not believe it. They assumed a different video was being shown to them the second time. We like to cling to our stories, our truths, even when it makes no sense to do so.

Are you holding tight to any stories at the moment? Is it possible the opposite of those stories could be true?

Opposite Stories 

This blog series is based on the writing of Pat Christen, Susan Edsall, Chris Murchison and Richard Tate. In creating Questions for a Curious Leader, we’ve benefited greatly from the contributions of several colleagues and partners. To learn more, please download the quick reference guide.   


Nicole Guthrie

How Can Technology Promote Mindfulness?

April 28, 2014

Take 100-plus tech and wisdom enthusiasts. Throw in eight prompts to incite action. And mash up the creative methods of Stanford d.school and the World Café. (Whatever you do, don’t forget a heaping dose of chocolate!)

What do you get?

A fun, high-energy progressive brainstorm that yields insights into the role technology might play in promoting mindfulness. Last February at Wisdom 2.0, participants in a tech intensive organized into small groups and responded to one of eight “How Might We…” prompts. After 30 minutes, teams rotated and picked up the thread of ideas from the previous group. The team at HopeLab distilled hundreds of Post-its and surfaced some wonderful themes.

Download the full PDF report below to see the themes that emerged from the progressive brainstorm. Here are just a few of them:

  • Making mindfulness more accessible to the general population
  • Leveraging self-tracking technologies to help people stay focused
  • Developing technologies to build communities and improve lives

Please read on!

This one